skip to Main Content

Where We Work

The AMBC focuses on vast offshore waters of the northwest Atlantic Ocean and diverse coastal habitats from Atlantic Canada to Florida that support migratory marine birds during all stages of their lives. Species that regularly depend on both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic are also an AMBC priority.

Learn More

Where We Work

The AMBC focuses on vast offshore waters of the northwest Atlantic Ocean and diverse coastal habitats from Atlantic Canada to Florida that support migratory marine birds during all stages of their lives. Species that regularly depend on both the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic are also an AMBC priority.

» Learn More

Recent News

Tracking and Movement Patterns of Black-capped Petrels Captured At-sea

The Black-capped Petrel (Pterodroma hasitata) is a highly endangered seabird in the North Atlantic, is listed as globally Endangered by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature, and is currently being reviewed…

Offfshore wind. European Wind Energy Association

Regional Collaboration to Understand and Minimize Waterbird Impacts from Offshore Wind Energy Development

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority is leading a range of regional, science-based stakeholder engagement efforts under the umbrella of the Environmental Technical Working Group for Offshore Wind (E-TWG).…

Plastic Ingestion and Bycatch Demographics of Great Shearwaters from the Gulf of Maine

Since 1950 globally monitored seabird populations have declined significantly, with possible causal factors including plastic pollution, fisheries bycatch, and climate change. Seabirds are particularly prone to plastic ingestion and are excellent indicators…

An Examination of Common, Arctic, Roseate, and Least Terns Diets in a Changing Climate in the Gulf of Maine

Keenan Yakola, a Masters student at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a fellow with the DOI Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center, completed his thesis evaluating chick diets of Common, Arctic, Least…

Back To Top